No Medicaid Cuts for People with Disabilities

Cuts announced in the Senate version for the AHCA severely impact Medicaid funding for people living with disabilities. Read the open letter from CFI Executive Director, Linda Taylor to learn how you can help make a difference and stop the cuts.

 

 

Cuts announced in the Senate version for the AHCA severely impact Medicaid funding for people living with disabilities. Read the open letter from CFI Executive Director, Linda Taylor to learn how you can help make a difference and stop the cuts.


 

NO Medicaid Cuts for People with Disabilities as proposed within the Senate version of the American Heath Care Act (AHCA)

Please make your voices heard. The pending health care reform legislation in the Senate will profoundly affect Coloradoans with disabilities. The salient points for Senators Bennett, Gardner, and the other 98 Senate Republicans are listed below:

  • Vote no on the AHCA or any bill that caps or cuts Medicaid or cuts healthcare and long-term care for people with disabilities.[i]
  • Make the Senate AHCA process transparent. With so many people affected, we need hearings and a bipartisan solution!
    • In Colorado, over 60% of Medicaid recipients are people with disabilities, elders or children according to the non-partisan Kaiser Family Foundation.[ii]
    • The American Health Care Act would decimate Medicaid — it would lead to $834 billion in cuts over the next decade.[iii]
    • According to the non-partisan Colorado Health Institute, this translates to a $14 billion cut in our state revenue, with a$340 million cut during the first year.[iv]
    • Colorado’s TABOR amendment makes raising revenue to cover cuts untenable.  In response, Colorado’s General Assembly will have no choice but to reduce services, cut optional services, restrict eligibility, and increase waiting lists. 
    • Colorado citizens with disabilities will be disproportionally harmed.  We make up about 7% of Medicaid participants but account for 27% the cost.[v]
    • Medicaid home and community-based services (HCBS) are at risk because they are optional and could be completely eliminated. HCBS provides assistance with eating, bathing, and dressing, as well as assistance with employment and community access.
    • There is no “acceptable” cap on Medicaid: the goal of any cap is simply to cut Medicaid spending, harming people with disabilities.
    • Caps do not give states more flexibility.  They just give states less money, decimating necessary services for people with disabilities.
    • Capping Medicaid for people with disabilities should not be part of the conversation about how to repeal and replace the ACA.  This would significantly change the bi-partisan funding formula in place since 1965, when the Medicaid program began. 

One-sixth of the American Economy is tied to health Care. Getting it right is more important to the American public than getting it done quickly.

Linda Taylor

Executive Director

Center for Independence

740 Gunnison Ave.

Grand Junction, CO 81501



[i] A U.S. Senate vote on the American Health Care Act has been proposed for late June, 2017.

[ii] Medicaid Enrollees by Enrollment Group, Kaiser Family Foundation, FY2014.  Accessed June 15, 2017 from:

http://www.kff.org/medicaid/state-indicator/distribution-of-medicaid-enrollees-by-enrollment-group/

[iii] Cost Estimate for the American Health Care Act of 2017.  Congressional Budget Office.  May 24, 2017.  Accessed June 12, 2017 at: https://www.cbo.gov/system/files/115th-congress-2017-2018/costestimate/hr1628aspassed.pdf

[iv] AHCA Effects on Medicaid, Colorado Health Institute.  March 16, 2017.  Accessed June 15, 2017 at: http://www.coloradohealthinstitute.org/research/ahca-effects-medicaid

[v] Putting Colorado’s Health First: 2015-16 Annual Report. Colorado Department of Health Care Policy and Financing.  Accessed June 19, 2017 at: https://www.colorado.gov/pacific/hcpf/hcpf-2015-2016-annual-report

 

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